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John Beagle View Drop Down
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    Posted: Apr 05 2014 at 3:00pm
Mozilla co-founder Eich, who invented the programming language Javascript, donated $1,000 in 2008 to support Proposition 8, which sought to ban same-sex marriage in California. Voters approved the measure, but it was struck down last June by the U.S. Supreme Court. 

Photo: Brendan Eich (Darcy Padilla/Courtesy of Mozilla)

Rarebit founders Hampton and Michael Catlin, a gay developer couple, pulled their software apps from Mozilla after Eich's appointment to CEO. OkCupid.com, the online dating site, called for a boycott of Firefox. Some on Twitter who identified themselves as Mozilla employees called for Eich to resign.

So Eich quit.

On Friday, news of Eich's departure prompted a backlash on Twitter. Many suggested Silicon Valley was intolerant of people with views outside northern California's liberal mainstream.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote John Beagle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 05 2014 at 3:14pm
I find it quite ironic that those who themselves were victims of intolerance are now showing intolerance toward a man who expressed his religion based opinion.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cmsquare Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 05 2014 at 3:48pm
Originally posted by John Beagle John Beagle wrote:

I find it quite ironic that those who themselves were victims of intolerance are now showing intolerance toward a man who expressed his religion based opinion.



I'm not quite sure that gay people would agree with you that they WERE victims of intolerance; meaning it is in their past and done with.

That is far from the case.

Perhaps this is a question that would be better raised when all rights are equal for everyone and not just the couples religion deems acceptable.





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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Matt_Steele Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 05 2014 at 4:08pm
Don't you think that there is a difference between holding your own private views about something, and actively trying to limit someone else's rights? 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Matt_Steele Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 05 2014 at 4:11pm
Also, this is not a free speech issue. The guy can have whatever views he wants and he can say whatever he wants. However society is allowed to decide whether or not they want to use that business or not. There's no free speech issue here. 

People can say all sorts of terrible things and can hold whatever thoughts they want. They shouldn't then believe that there isn't any consequences for their thoughts or sayings, especially if the majority of society feels a certain way.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote John Beagle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 06 2014 at 7:28pm
MAHER: What do you think about the Mozilla CEO having to step down over his donation to a pro-Proposition 8 group. 

The Mozilla -- which I'm wearing right now, by the way. I didn't know what Mozilla was. I saw it on my computer, but -- it's Firefix, right? It's the browser. 

So this guy apparently does not want gay people to get married and he had to step down. What do you think of that, the question asks.

FMR. REP. TOM DAVIS (R-VA): Because he gave $1,000 eight years ago and it's come back to haunt him.

CARRIE SHEFFIELD, FORBES: Well, and he gave it when President Obama was still against gay marriage. So, I don't think it's very fair.

MAHER: Good point. Also, I think there is a gay mafia. I think if you cross them, you do get whacked.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Matt_Steele Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 06 2014 at 10:23pm
Originally posted by John Beagle John Beagle wrote:

MAHER: What do you think about the Mozilla CEO having to step down over his donation to a pro-Proposition 8 group. 

The Mozilla -- which I'm wearing right now, by the way. I didn't know what Mozilla was. I saw it on my computer, but -- it's Firefix, right? It's the browser. 

So this guy apparently does not want gay people to get married and he had to step down. What do you think of that, the question asks.

FMR. REP. TOM DAVIS (R-VA): Because he gave $1,000 eight years ago and it's come back to haunt him.

CARRIE SHEFFIELD, FORBES: Well, and he gave it when President Obama was still against gay marriage. So, I don't think it's very fair.

MAHER: Good point. Also, I think there is a gay mafia. I think if you cross them, you do get whacked.

and....? the point?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote blueblood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 07 2014 at 7:43am
Joel Kotkin: The spread of 'debate is over' syndrome

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/media-608400-many-one.html

The ongoing trial involving journalist Mark Steyn – accused of defaming climate change theorist Michael Mann – reflects an increasingly dangerous tendency among our intellectual classes to embrace homogeneity of viewpoint. Steyn, whose column has appeared for years on these pages, may be alternatingly entertaining or over-the-top obnoxious, but the slander lawsuit against him marks a milestone in what has become a dangerously authoritarian worldview being adopted in academia, the media and large sections of the government bureaucracy.

Let’s call it “the debate is over” syndrome, referring to a term used most often in relationship with climate change but also by President Barack Obama last week in reference to what remains his contentious, and theoretically reformable, health care plan. Ironically, this shift to certainty now comes increasingly from what passes for the Left in America.

These are the same people who historically have identified themselves with open-mindedness and the defense of free speech, while conservatives, with some justification, were associated more often with such traits as criminalizing unpopular views – as seen in the 1950s McCarthy era – and embracing canonical bans on all sorts of personal behavior, a tendency still more evident than necessary among some socially minded conservatives.

But when it comes to authoritarian expression of “true” beliefs, it’s the progressive Left that increasingly seeks to impose orthodoxy. In this rising intellectual order, those who dissent on everything from climate change, the causes of poverty and the definition of marriage, to opposition to abortion are increasingly marginalized and, in some cases, as in the Steyn trial, legally attacked.

A few days ago, Brendan Eich, CEO of the web browser company Mozilla, resigned under pressure from gay rights groups. Why? Because it was revealed he donated $1,000 to the campaign to pass Proposition 8, California’s since-overturned ballot measure defining marriage as between one man and one woman.

In many cases, I might agree with some leftist views, say, on gay marriage or the critical nature of income inequality, but liberals should find these intolerant tendencies terrifying and dangerous in a democracy dependent on the free interchange of ideas.

This shift has been building for decades and follows the increasingly uniform capture of key institutions – universities, the mass media and the bureaucracy – by people holding a set of “acceptable” viewpoints. Ironically, the shift toward a uniform worldview started in the 1960s, in part as a reaction to the excesses of Sen. Joseph McCarthy and the oppressive conformity of the 1950s.

But what started as liberation and openness has now engendered an ever-more powerful clerisy – an educated class – that seeks to impose particular viewpoints while marginalizing and, in the most-extreme cases, criminalizing, divergent views.

Today’s clerisy in some ways resembles the clerical First Estate in pre-revolutionary France, which, in the words of the historian Georges Lefebvre, “possessed a control over thought in the interests of the Church and king.” With today’s clerisy, notes essayist Joseph Bottum, “social and political ideas [are] elevated to the status of strange divinities ... born of the ancient religious hunger to perceive more in the world than just the give and take of ordinary human beings, but adapted to an age that piously congratulates itself on its escape from many of the strictures of ancient religion.”

To be sure, there remains a still-potent camp of conservative ideologues, many associated with think tanks, such as the Heritage Foundation, and a host of publications, most notably the media empire controlled by the Murdoch family. But, for the most part, today’s clerisy in media and academia tilts in one basic direction, embracing a fairly uniform set of secular “truths” on issues ranging from the nature of justice, race and gender, to the environment.

Those who dissent from the “accepted” point of view may not suffer excommunication, burning at the stake or other public rituals of penance, but can expect their work to be vilified or simply ignored. In some bastions of the new clerisy, such as San Francisco, an actress with unsuitable views can be pilloried, and a campaign launched to remove her from a production for supporting a Tea Party candidate.

Nowhere is this shift more evident than in academia, as evidenced in Mann’s civil action against Steyn. The climate change issue, one of great import and worthy of serious consideration, is now being buried by the seemingly unscientific notion that everyone needs to follow orthodoxy on an issue that – like the nature of God in the Middle Ages – is considered “settled,” and those who do not agree deserve to be pilloried.

But climate change is just one manifestation of the new authoritarian view in academia. On many college campuses, “speech codes” have become an increasingly popular way to control thought at many campuses. Like medieval dons, our academic worthies concentrate their fire on those whose views – say on social issues – offend the new canon. No surprise, then, as civil libertarian Nat Hentoff notes, that a 2010 survey of 24,000 college students found that barely a third of them thought it “safe to hold unpopular views on campus.”

This is not terribly surprising, given the lack of intellectual diversity on many campuses. Various studies of political orientation of academics have found liberals outnumber conservatives, from 8-to-1 to 14-to-1. Whether this is a reflection of simply natural preferences of the well-educated or partially blatant discrimination remains arguable, but some research suggests that roughly two of five professors would be less inclined to hire an evangelical or conservative colleague than one more conventionally liberal.

Political uniformity is certainly in vogue. A remarkable 96 percent of presidential campaign donations from the nation’s Ivy League faculty and staff in 2012 went to Obama, a margin more reminiscent of Soviet Russia than a properly functioning pluralistic academy.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote John Beagle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 07 2014 at 9:41am

Some gay activists fear same-sex supporters are becoming intolerant

Pushing out Mozilla executive a step too far?


Andrew Sullivan, who more or less began the public campaign for same-sex marriage in the 1990s, erupted with an article warning gays and liberals about "becoming just as intolerant of others' views as the Christianists." (Associated Press)

Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/apr/6/some-gay-activists-fear-same-sex-supporters-are-be/?utm_source=RSS_Feed&utm_medium=RSS#ixzz2yCvhwMTU 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Matt_Steele Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 07 2014 at 10:17am
Look, again, you can have whatever views you want to have. I also can not discriminate against you for most of those views. However that doesn't mean that I have to buy your product or vote for you or passively allow you to have a position of power. That's America and the free market. 

Mozilla, a business, was getting pushback by the market against their product. They want their product to sell and be successful, so they made a change. Isn't this how business works? 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote John Beagle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 07 2014 at 10:50am
It was a witch hunt by a small group of people. Essentially a hate crime against the man and his religious convictions. 

As for the overall marketspeak, most Firefox users don't know or don't care. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Matt_Steele Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 07 2014 at 11:00am
Originally posted by John Beagle John Beagle wrote:

It was a witch hunt by a small group of people. Essentially a hate crime against the man and his religious convictions. 

As for the overall marketspeak, most Firefox users don't know or don't care. 

Then why make the change? If it's only a small group of people.

Also, not a hate crime. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cmsquare Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 07 2014 at 11:07am

Originally posted by John Beagle John Beagle wrote:

It was a witch hunt by a small group of people. Essentially a hate crime against the man and his religious convictions. 

As for the overall marketspeak, most Firefox users don't know or don't care. 



Here's the thing.

These religious convictions you speak of. 

Nobody is looking to for you to change your religion or recognize gay marriage within it.  No one is asking you to allow ceremonies to happen in your place of worship.  You are free to do whatever you want within those walls.  You can keep gay people from marrying or even walking in the door if that is what you want.

This picking and choosing which verses of the bible are followed is a very slippery slope.  It's fundamentalism at it's roots.

When your religion starts to dictate laws the effect the public; and not just members of your religion that is where the issue begins.  Especially when money from out of state (Utah) floods in from a church and influences a vote in another state (California) as happened previously.

As far as your assessment of the overall market speak I would say that Mozilla as a company disagrees with you and in a free market that is their right. 

You can go out and speak to whatever it is you want as CEO of your company and you too would have to deal with the fall out in the marketplace if any.  If this guy is such an outstanding CEO then he will have no issues finding another gig.  That is capitalism. 

 




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cmsquare Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 07 2014 at 11:26am
On a related note I really did enjoy the pilot episode of HBO's new show Silicon Valley.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote John Beagle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 07 2014 at 1:26pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote John Beagle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 09 2014 at 3:32pm

Brendan Eich wasn't the only Silicon Valley opponent of gay marriage


Are you now or have you ever been an opponent of gay marriage?

The question has become something of a litmus test in Silicon Valley of late with the forced ouster of Mozilla’s newly appointed CEO over the issue.

Brendan Eich, a co-founder of Mozilla who helped develop the free web browser and Javascript, was forced out of his new job last week over his support for a 2008 ballot measure in California banning gay marriage.

An online dating service urged its customers to avoid using the Firefox browser because Eich had donated money supporting Proposition 8. The measure was approved by voters but subsequently overturned in the courts. It later discovered that Sam Yagan, the dating service’s chief executive, had himself donated to a conservative Utah congressman who opposed gay rights measures.

Employees at Apple AAPL, Tesla, Intel, Google, Hewlett-Packard, Cisco  and Oracle all gave money in support of Proposition 8 according to searches of the database.

http://blogs.marketwatch.com/thetell/2014/04/09/brandon-eich-wasnt-the-only-silicon-valley-opponent-of-gay-marriage/

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Matt_Steele Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 09 2014 at 3:56pm
Aren't employees different than CEO's? 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cmsquare Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 10 2014 at 5:05pm
Not silicon valley but interesting nonetheless how one company decided to handle the backlash from some new adds that celebrated all families.

You can read more about the whole story here.
http://www.thebraiser.com/one-million-moms-compares-gay-parents-to-poison/

here is the second commercial they released in response to the criticism for the first.








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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote John Beagle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 11 2014 at 2:33pm
Originally posted by Matt_Steele Matt_Steele wrote:

Aren't employees different than CEO's? 

CEO's are employees. So no, employees are the same as far as being employed goes.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cmsquare Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 11 2014 at 6:45pm
Yes Ceo's are employees

But not all employees are held to the standards of a CEO.

As a business owner you should understand this.

As a CEO you are the face of a company.  The same cannot be said for someone sitting in a cubicle.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Matt_Steele Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 14 2014 at 8:03am
Originally posted by John Beagle John Beagle wrote:

Originally posted by Matt_Steele Matt_Steele wrote:

Aren't employees different than CEO's? 

CEO's are employees. So no, employees are the same as far as being employed goes.

Well they certainly make boatloads more money (and I mean literal boats, you can measure the difference between average ceo and average other employee wage by how many boats it could buy), have much more power and responsibility and are more important to the company's direction than pretty much any other employee. So, don't you see the difference here?

No one is going to boycott Apple because some quality assurance engineer doesn't want gays to marry. But if Steve Jobs had been against it, then people would react.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cmsquare Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 22 2014 at 1:31am
First you are expected to treat gay couples with respect and dignity and now the same for women???

What gives silicon valley?  The levels of acceptance you force on your CEO's is just disgusting.   I recall a day and time when a man could express his bigoted feelings with no fear of reprocusions.

What has this world come too?  Where do you draw the line?  So much for freedom of speech.

*rolls eyes*


http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/04/21/github-founder-resigns-after-investigation/

GitHub Founder Resigns After Investigation


Tom Preston-Werner, a co-founder and former chief executive of GitHub, a website for sharing and collaborating on software code, resigned on Monday after an investigation into gender-based harassment. But the company said the investigation found no evidence of illegal practices.

The accusations surfaced last month, when Julie Ann Horvath, a software designer and developer at GitHub, publicly resigned, saying there was a culture of disrespect and intimidation of women at the company. That included mistreatment by Mr. Preston-Warner and his wife, who was not a GitHub employee. Ms. Horvath’s resignation attracted much attention in the tech community, as an example of the sexism and alpha-male culture that are endemic in software engineering.

“The investigation found no evidence to support the claims against Tom and his wife of sexual or gender-based harassment or retaliation, or of a sexist or hostile work environment,” Chris Wanstrath, GitHub’s chief executive and a co-founder, wrote in a blog post on Monday. “However, while there may have been no legal wrongdoing, the investigator did find evidence of mistakes and errors of judgment.”

He added that GitHub was starting initiatives led by employees and the human resources department to try to make it a more inclusive workplace and to ensure that employee concerns were dealt with appropriately. “We know we still have work to do,” he wrote. Despite being founded in 2008, GitHub hired its first senior human resources executive this year.

Ms. Horvath responded to the announcement on Twitter. Among other posts, she wrote, “Bullying someone into quitting: Illegal,” “Pushing women with strong opinions out of your company because they disagree with you is wrong” and “Leaving GitHub was the best decision of my life.”

Mr. Preston-Werner on Monday wrote that he had “made mistakes” but added, “We are prepared to fight any further false claims on this matter to the full extent of the law.”

Stuart Isett for The New York TimesJulie Ann Horvath, a software designer and developer, quit her job at GitHub in March, saying that there was a culture of intimidation and disrespect of women.

Ms. Horvath is a prominent figure in the movement to change the culture for women in tech. She started a program called Passion Projects, at which a technical woman presents her work in San Francisco each month. GitHub had sponsored the project but signed it over to Ms. Horvath when she quit. She is restarting it within a new organization called Playing with Possibility and expanding to New York and Chicago.

Women, who account for only one-fifth of software engineers, are even more outnumbered in open-source software. Ms. Horvath was the only female developer at GitHub when she was hired, and just 2 percent of people in the open-source software field are women.

GitHub, which has raised $100 million from the venture firm Andreessen Horowitz, has had considerable success, brashly illustrated by the elaborate bar and mock Oval Office at its San Francisco headquarters.

The reaction to GitHub’s announcement in the tech community was swift and largely negative.





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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cmsquare Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 29 2014 at 3:05pm
Also let's point out this issue has NOTHING to do uniquely with silicone valley.
Donald Sterling can tell you all about that.


If you are a prominent figure in a company and spout off racist, bigoted, ignorant things you can be held accountable for them.

Freedom of speech gives you every right to say these things; it does not protect you from the fall out.


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/30/sports/basketball/nba-donald-sterling-los-angeles-clippers.html

Donald Sterling, the longtime owner of the Los Angeles Clippers, was barred from the N.B.A. for life and fined $2.5 million by the league’s commissioner, Adam Silver, on Tuesday for making racist remarks. Silver said that Sterling would be barred from any contact with his team and the league and that he would urge the league’s board of governors to force Sterling to sell the team.

The fine, Silver said, was the maximum allowed by the league’s constitution.

“The views expressed by Mr. Sterling are deeply offensive and harmful,” Silver said. “We stand together in condemning Mr. Sterling’s views. They simply have no place in the N.B.A.”

Silver said Sterling, in an interview, had admitted to him that the racist remarks on a recording released last week by the website TMZ were his. Silver said he would “do everything in my power” to see that Sterling was forced to sell the Clippers. “I fully expect to get the support I need to remove him,” Silver said.

Before the announcement, Silver said, he discussed the decision with Coach Doc Rivers and guard Chris Paul of the Clippers. “I believe the players will be satisfied with the decision,” Silver said.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bobpreston Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 30 2014 at 7:48pm
I wonder will they kick Spike Lee out for all his racist comments??? Probably not!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cmsquare Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr 30 2014 at 8:27pm

Does Spike Lee own a basketball team?

I must have missed that.

Really good point though!!
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